MID-WEEK PLAY EXCHANGE RECAP

Let’s get real for a second.

You haven’t been to the Play Exchange yet.

We get it. You’re busy. There’s still time.

You have four more chances!

Tonight, we go to the wilds of the domestic interior for Brenda Withers’ THE DING DONGS, or, What is the Penalty in Portugal? directed by George Pate. This fast-paced absurd comedy will keep you on your toes through its many deft twists and turns. (Tickets here!)

 

Tomorrow night, Mariah MacCarthy’s THE HAZARDS OF LOVING WHILE BROKEN, directed by Lauren Ferebee, takes us on an emotional rollercoaster through three lives that have been irrevocably changed by loss and love. (Tickets here!)

 

Saturday we travel back in time with Nat Cassidy’s OLD FAMILIAR FACES, directed by Tim Giles, to tell two parallel stories of madness and love across time, connected by Shakespeare’s language. Part horror story, part love story, part classical play, this play is an extraordinary journey. (Tickets here!)

 

Finally on Sunday, Geraldine Inoa’s FRAGMENTS takes us inside an insane asylum to understand the powerful experiences of three of its patients, scarred and changed by their life experiences. (Tickets here!)

 

If you missed the first four plays in the Play Exchange, you should know, magic is happening this week in the Black Box at the Chapman Cultural Center. Here are some of the journeys our audience have gotten to take:

Last night, August Schulenberg’s play DREAM WALKER, directed by Jay E. Coffman, transported our audience into a lyrical world where lives can change in dreams.

Dream Dawn and Richie 2

On Tuesday, Gina Femia’s SUPER, or How Clark Graves Learned to Fly, directed by CHANDLER CRAWFORD, taught us how to fly together with its teen protagonist.

On Monday, we followed Josie on her nail-biting fairytale journey to find her father in Kristen Palmer’s ONCE UPON A BRIDE THERE WAS A FOREST directed by Connor Vetter.

Sunday, Patric Lane Phillips brought to life Alexis Roblan’s GENESIS, which took us back to the stories of Adam and Eve and Cain and Abel to open up questions of faith, love, and humanity.

We’ve had wonderful audiences and incredible artists, and we can’t wait to share these next four plays with you.

 

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